Responding to a Reader: 10 Small but Great Journals

Thanks to Tom Tenbrunsel who recently left a comment on my blog in reference to some of the publication opportunities I have posted. Here’s what Tom wrote.

Denton – I have tried a dozen of your suggested posts sifting through their stated themes, meeting their deadlines, even paying some to no avail. I fear your suggested posts might be less for beginners as all mine did and more for esoteric publishing. Do you have any down to earth, plain talking good ole boy publishing sources for someone who is from the hills of Appalachia with a story or two and a lesson perhaps as good or bettern’ highfalutin writers?

Tom is right that I post a lot of top-tier journals in my lists.  Not all, but a lot. Top-tier journals receive a large number of submissions, often from excellent writers.  These journals are very competitive in terms of quality, but they are also very competitive in terms of quantity.  Some journals receive as many as 6,000 to 10,000 submissions for a single issue. However, every editor is eager and universally open to writers looking for their first publication.

One reason that I started making these publication lists was to encourage friends (and myself) to aim high when submitting work.  I personally wrack up a lot of rejections, but I know that it’s par for the course.  I expect it, and if you want to be a published writer, you should expect it too.

There are hundreds if not thousands of literary magazines and journals out there though.  And for every top-tier journal, there is a smaller journal who doesn’t receive as many submissions and is still excellent.  I put together a short list of 10 such journals, thanks to Tom’s prompting. Note that several of these publications are especially interested in writing about Appalachia.

I want to be clear that just because these publications are smaller does NOT mean that they will accept sub-standard work.  I personally know and have worked with the editors at most of these journals, and they are dedicated to publishing the highest quality writing. That’s why it’s important to make sure your submission is the best it can possibly be.  To get it to that place, ask yourself a few questions. Are you sharing your work with other good writers (such as in a critique group)?  Have you attended any workshops and conferences where you can study with published writers?  Are you following each journal’s submission guidelines?  And have you read the journals to be sure that your submission matches their aesthetic?

You’re only ready to submit when you’ve done all of these things.  If that’s you, then good luck!

 

Appalachian Journal

We accept manuscripts from a variety of disciplines, as long as the work focuses on the Appalachian region. Major fields of interest include anthropology, art, cultural studies, ecology, economics, education, ethnography, film, folklore, health care, history, gender studies, geography, literature, media, music, political science, sociology, and studies of sustainability. We like well-documented, well-developed articles that feature primary source research.  We also publish poetry.

https://appjournal.appstate.edu/writers-guidelines

 

Birmingham Arts Journal

The Journal is operated without profit by passionate volunteers, who believe that exceptional works by the famous, not-yet-famous, and never-to-be-famous deserve to be published side by side in a beautiful and creative setting.  We accept Fiction and Non-Fiction up to 1,000 words. Excerpts and quotes of fewer than 1,000 words from longer works are published, too. We accept all types of Poetry up to 50 lines. Shorter works are preferred.

http://www.birminghamartsjournal.com/submissions.html

 

Fiction Southeast: An Online Journal Dedicated to Short Fiction

The editors of Fiction Southeast are interested in short fiction (approximately 1500 words or less). We are also interested in interviews with authors of short fiction, articles concerning fiction craft, as well as reviews of short story collections (preferably, but not limited to, collections of flash or micro shorts).

https://fictionsoutheast.submittable.com/submit

 

Floyd County Moonshine

Floyd County Moonshine invites you to submit poetry, short stories, essays, and artwork in a digital format. We accept literary works addressing all manner of themes; however, preference is generally given to those works of a rural or Appalachian nature. A bi-annual publication, Floyd County Moonshine has been in production about five years, publishing a variety of home-grown Appalachian writers in addition to writers from across the country.

http://www.floydcountymoonshine.com/submissions.html

 

HeartWood Literary Magazine

HeartWood is an online literary magazine in association with West Virginia Wesleyan’s Low-Residency MFA program. We publish twice yearly, in April and October. Our inaugural issue will go live April 2016. We accept submissions year round and welcome previously unpublished poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, from both established and emerging writers.  We do love Appalachian voices, but we enthusiastically encourage writers from all backgrounds to submit.

http://www.heartwoodlitmag.com/submit/

 

Main Street Rag

Main Street Rag Publishing Company has been publishing our print magazine, The Main Street Rag, uninterrupted since 1996. Among its features are poetry, short fiction, photography, essays, interviews, reviews, and commentary. Submit Fiction and Creative Non-Fiction up to 6000 words.  Submit up to 6 pages of poetry. That can mean one long poem or as many as 6 one-page (or shorter) poems. No Simultaneous submissions.

http://03c9c48.netsolhost.com/WordPress/magazineliterary-magazine/

 

New Southerner Annual Literary Contest

We accept submissions of previously unpublished poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction for our annual literary contest. Although the contest theme is open, we are especially interested in work that relates to our mission, which is promoting self-reliance, environmental stewardship, and local economies. Winning entries, as well as finalists and semifinalists, are published in The New Southerner Literary Edition, available in print.

http://www.newsoutherner.com/contest/

 

Pikeville Review

Submit fiction and creative nonfiction up to 5000 words. All prose should be double spaced and in standard font. For poetry, send up to 5 poems. Poems may be single spaced. Open Submission period: October 1 – December 31. Notifications will be sent in late January and publication will occur in March.

http://www.upike.edu/pikevillereview

 

Souvenir Literary Journal

“A Journal to Help Remind You Of Where You’ve Been & The Places You’d Like To Go”

http://www.souvenirlit.com/submissions/

 

Town Creek Poetry

William Wright, Editor

The editors of Town Creek Poetry tend to favor poems that use the natural world in an original way, particularly in a way that elucidates deeper human issues. Our preferences lean toward the narrative and lyric. We wish for a tightly paced story, and we like poems that put something at stake. Please send up to three poems at a time.

http://www.towncreekpoetry.com/submissions.htm

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Recommended Reading 10/9/2017

Here’s a quick list of some of the wonderful poetry and nonfiction that I’ve found online in the last couple of weeks.  This list is woefully short of fiction recommendations, but I’ll try to fix that soon.  In the meantime, enjoy these pieces:

Joanne Nelson has a new essay, “Just Leave the Damn Thing Open” online in the new issue of museum of americana: https://themuseumofamericana.net/current-issue/just-leave-the-damn-thing-open-nonfiction-by-joanne-nelson/.

Linda Michel-Cassidy interviewed Louise Marburg for Why There Are Wordshttps://www.wtawpress.org/louise-marburg-interview?platform=hootsuite

Megan Culhane-Galbraith and Walter Robinson both have work listed as Notable Essays in the Best American Essays 2017.  Megan’s piece, “Sin Will Find You Out” was originally published at Catapult: https://catapult.co/stories/sin-will-find-you-out.  Walter’s essay, “This Will Sting and Burn,” was originally published at The Sun: https://www.thesunmagazine.org/issues/481/this-will-sting-and-burn.

Didi Jackson has a beautiful poem, “Signs for the Living,” in The New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/10/02/signs-for-the-living.

Corina Zappia has a brilliant new essay in Catapult about growing up in Texas, and a lot of it sure reminds me of what it’s like to live in Tennessee: https://catapult.co/stories/places-loving-hating-and-being-from-texas.

Cassie Pruyn’s poetry collection, Lena, has been reviewed by Lambda Literary Review: https://www.lambdaliterary.org/reviews/09/13/lena-by-cassie-pruyn/ .

Emily Mohn-Slate’s poem, “Landscape with Ex-husband Lingering,” has been nominated for a Best of the Net Award by Gulf Stream Literary Magazine: https://gulfstreamlitmag.com/landscape-with-ex-husband-lingering/

Mark Powell’s Small Treasons

Mark Powell’s latest novel, Small Treasons, examines a number of the tragedies and obstacles that particularly face us in these uncertain times.  But also, as with the best of literature, Powell is exploring some of the most universal questions of humanity.  Perhaps the central question of this book is about forgiveness.  Forgiveness of others, and more importantly, forgiveness of ourselves.

At the heart of this question is John Maynard, man whose past blocks him from having genuine relationships with his parents, his children and even his wife.  His wife, Tess, has a secret also.  She has become obsessed with videos ISIS beheadings.  And then there is Reed Sharma, one of Powell’s most complex characters: a young, would-be jihadist searching for something truthful, something more meaningful than those things that satisfy most young Americans, but unable to discern love from hate.

One of the strongest factors that keeps forgiveness at bay is the distance that builds between us and others.  Powell wrote an essay for Authors ‘Round The South about Don DeLillo’s book Players and how that book and the idea of distance inspired Small Treasons: http://authorsroundthesouth.com/90-the-southern-bookstore/10693-mark-powell-finds-his-bookstore.

I’ve read all of Mark Powell’s novels, falling in love along the way with all of them.  There are lines and images from each one that stick with me, and even more so, there are life-shattering questions and explorations from each book that haunt me.  Possibly to Powell’s own detriment, he is able to see the ever-moving mechanics of our modern world, all of the forces working with and against each other.  To our great fortune, Powell is able to use that knowledge to write a book like Small Treasons, both beautiful and tragic.

MarkPowell_AndBook_m

For more about Mark Powell and his work, check out his webpage http://www.markpowellauthor.com/.

Submission Calls for Writers 10/3/2017

submissions

Here are a baker’s dozen new opportunities for writers.  A few of these journals are closing their reading periods this month.  Others have just opened and are waiting for your submissions.  Good luck!

Foundry

Foundry always open for general submissions (free). Please submit 3-5 original, previously unpublished poems. Simultaneous submissions are encouraged. We pay $10 per poem. Foundry publishes a range of styles and forms, from short lyric poems to prose poems and longer narratives. We are committed to inclusivity and warmly welcome submissions from marginalized voices.

http://www.foundryjournal.com/submit.html

 

New Madrid

We will dedicate our winter 2018 issue to the theme of “Total Eclipse.” Our hope is also to address the theme of total eclipse from metaphorical directions. We invite work inspired by social and political phenomena; for example, some have referred to both the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union (Brexit) and to the election of Donald J. Trump to the United States presidency as total eclipses. We also encourage work that takes on the theme from a personal direction, as in the total eclipse of a marriage or friendship. We are essentially open to any work that addresses the obscuring of the light that is fundamental to a total eclipse. Secrecy is prime territory for this issue, as is any kind of blotting out, blocking, concealing, darkening. Apocalypse is also a possible subject. And of course, we welcome contributions along our theme from amateur or professional astronomers, and from skygazers of any kind. All submissions should be of interest to the general reader. Please do not submit scholarly articles. Submissions will be accepted between August 15 and October 15.

https://newmadridjournal.org/submissions/

 

Rappahannock Review

The Rappahannock Review, an online literary journal published through the University of Mary Washington, is currently accepting submissions in Poetry, Fiction, and Nonfiction from established and emerging writers. We’re currently reading for our general issue 5.1, which will be published in December, and we’d love to consider your work. Submissions will remain open until October 15.

https://rappahannockreview.submittable.com/submit

 

Good Works Review

The former Kentucky Review is now operating as Good Works Review.  They are currently open to submissions of poetry, short fiction, essays, and black-and-white artwork. All profits from sales are donated to the ACLU. Our first annual issue will appear in print in December 2017. Deadline for submission is October 15.

http://goodworksreview.futurecycle.org/guidelines.html

 

Crab Orchard Review

Our first online special issue of Crab Orchard Review will focus on “Ka-ching!: The Money Issue.” Submissions are free until October 31, 2017. It is not lost upon us that this is the first special issue we won’t be paying contributors, but we hope writers will embrace this topic and explore all the ways our lives and our world are shaped by money, whether you are cashing in, cashing out, or maybe even caring and sharing a little while we all try to get by.

http://craborchardreview.siu.edu/general-call.html

 

The Larry Brown Short Story Award

The editors at Pithead Chapel are pleased to announce the second annual Larry Brown Short Story Award. The winners will receive the following prizes: 1st place $250, 2nd place $75, and 3rd place $25. Each prize winner will be published in the January 2018 issue of Pithead Chapel. The 2017 Guest Judge is Anne Valente. Submission Fee: $10 per story. Submit by October 31, 2017.

www.pitheadchapel.com

 

Kenyon Review

During the 2017 reading period, we will be accepting submissions from September 15th through November 1st, 2017. We consider short fiction and essays (up to 7,500 words); poetry (up to 6 poems; please format and submit as a single document); plays (up to 30 pages); excerpts (up to 30 pages) from larger works; translations of poetry and short prose.

https://www.kenyonreview.org/submission/

 

South 85

South 85 Journal is currently accepting poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and visual art submissions through November 1, 2017, for our Fall / Winter 2017 issue, which will come out December 15.  Fiction submissions should be no longer than 10,000 words. Non-fiction submissions should be no longer than 8,000 words. You may submit up to 5 poems and up to 10 total pages.

http://south85journal.com/submission-guidelines/

 

Everywhere Stories: Short Fiction from a Small Planet

Volume III of Everywhere Stories: Short Fiction from a Small Planet will be published by Press 53 in the Fall of 2018. Submissions are open through November 30, 2017. Everywhere Stories is an anthology series of short fiction set around the world. We will NOT repeat countries (except the US, where we will not repeat states), so be sure to review the submission guidelines to see what countries we’ve already covered. No maximum or minimum length.

https://press53.submittable.com/submit/94181/everywhere-stories-short-fiction-from-a-small-planet-volume-iii

 

Fifth Wednesday Journal

Fifth Wednesday Journal is an independent literary print magazine published twice yearly by Fifth Wednesday Books. We accept electronic submissions in the categories of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, essays, and black-and-white photography. FWJ publishes short stories, excerpts from novels, creative nonfiction, book excerpts, and essays, as long as the excerpt stands on its own as a literary work. There are no set limits on length of a work, but manuscripts of less than 1,000 or more than 12,000 words are less likely to make it into the journal. Please limit your submission of poetry to one set of up to five poems. Submissions for Spring 2018 will close on December 1, 2017.

http://www.fifthwednesdayjournal.org/

 

Tammy Journal

Tammy is reading submissions for its ninth issue. Founded in 2009, Tammy is a print journal and chapbook publisher from the esteemed fringes and unguarded egresses of American letters. Our issues have featured writers such as Ashley M. Jones, Lydia Davis, Ottessa Moshfegh, Sarah Gerard, Ander Monson, Kamen Hilliard, and Abraham Smith. JoAnna Novak, Tyler Flynn Dorholt, and Thomas Cook are the Editors and Publishers. Please submit through December 1. We look forward to reading your work!

www.tammyjournal.com

 

Third Coast

Founded in 1995 by graduate students of the Western Michigan University English department, Third Coast is one of the nation’s premier literary magazines. Fiction, poetry, essay, and drama submissions are now OPEN from September 15th, 2017 through December 15th, 2017. Submit fiction manuscripts of up to 7,500 words (or up to 25 pages). We accept up to five pieces of flash fiction, or “short shorts,” at a time. Submit nonfiction manuscripts of up to 7,000 words. Submit poetry manuscripts of no more than three poems at a time (with a maximum of fifteen pages).

http://thirdcoastmagazine.com/submissions/

 

Salamander

Salamander, which is published biannually, features poetry, fiction, and memoirs; our open reading period for 2017-2018 is October 3–April 28. Submit no more than five poems at a time. For Fiction and Non-fiction: Submit one story or memoir at a time. We request that you only send one submission per reading period (every six months).

http://salamandermag.org/how-to-submit/

 

 

Submission Calls for Writers 9/7/2017

submissions

Here are 12 opportunities for writers, many from journals who have just opened reading periods at the beginning of this month.  My friend April Darcy told me that at the beginning of the season journals read to find treasures, and at the end they read to reject. So now is the time to submit!

Juked

There are no limits on word count for prose—we like narratives and essays of all sizes, so long as the colors fit. If it’s a short story, send us one piece at a time—please wait to hear from us before sending another. If you’re working with the short short form, please send three to five selections in the same submission. Submit a maximum of five poems. We read year-round.

http://www.juked.com/info/submit.asp

 

Ponder Review

Ponder Review is a publication of the Low-Res MFA program in creative writing at Mississippi for Women. Ponder Review is accepting submissions of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, flash fiction, and visual art through September 15, 2017. We want your best writing on any topic! No theme this time. We have a $2 submission fee and are a non-paying market. Contributors whose work is chosen for publication will receive a complementary copy of the issue in which their work appears.

http://www.ponderreview.com

 

Subtropics

Subtropics seeks to publish the best literary fiction, essays, and poetry being written today, both by established and emerging authors. We will consider works of fiction of any length, from short shorts to novellas and self-contained novel excerpts. We give the same latitude to essays. Submit one story, one essay, or up to four poems in one document. Please include your contact information, including your email address, on the document. We will be reading submissions from September 1st through September 30th, 2017.

http://subtropics.english.ufl.edu/index.php/submissions/

 

Tin House Winter Workshops Scholarship

These workshops combine the rugged beauty of the Oregon Coast with a weekend immersed in all things literary. The program consists of morning workshops, one-on-one meetings with faculty, afternoon craft discussions, and generative exercises. Awarding one full scholarship for 2018 Winter Workshop sessions. As a result of a private donation, we will also be awarding two partial scholarships this year (not tied to any genre). A full scholarship includes both tuition and housing + a $75 food stipend. Scholarship submissions must be received by October 17, 2017, General Submissions must be received by November 22, 2017.

http://tinhouse.com/winter-workshops/?mc_cid=26f3e5265f&mc_eid=508eb4b613

 

Washington Square Review

We accept submissions from August 1 through October 15. Poetry submissions should not exceed ten pages/five poems. Fiction submissions should not exceed twenty pages. Please submit one story per submission.

http://www.washingtonsquarereview.com/submit/?mc_cid=26f3e5265f&mc_eid=508eb4b613

 

Long Story, Short

The Long Story, Short is a literary journal for short stories only. Please do NOT send chapters from novels, novellas, or other work that is not a short story in form. Stories for children are not in the scope of this journal. Translations are accepted. Genre fiction will only be considered should it have very strong literary merit. Stories should be over 4000 words long, although a few hundred words less is welcome. There is no upper word limit, so long as the author considers the work a short story. A maximum of two stories at a time will be considered. Deadline: October 31, 2017.

https://longstoryshort.squarespace.com/submissions/?mc_cid=26f3e5265f&mc_eid=508eb4b613

 

The Vestal Review

Vestal Review is the oldest magazine dedicated exclusively to flash fiction. It has been published continuously since March 2000. Vestal Review now publishes its print issues twice a year in a perfect-bound edition. Some of the content is available on the Web. Vestal Review is a magazine for flash (short-shorts) fiction.   We realize that there are different definitions of what a flash story is and all of them have merit. In our definition, a flash story is no longer than 500 words and it has a plot. Our current reading period is from August through November. Send no more than two submissions per author in a reading period.

http://www.vestalreview.org/guidelines/

 

One Story

One Story is seeking literary fiction. Because of our format, we can only accept stories between 3,000 and 8,000 words. They can be any style and on any subject as long as they are good. We are looking for stories that leave readers feeling satisfied and are strong enough to stand alone. Our current reading period closes November 14, 2017.

https://www.one-story.com/index.php?page=submit

 

Witness

Witness blends the features of a literary and an issue-oriented magazine to highlight the role of the modern writer as witness to their times. Witness seeks original fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and photography that is innovative in its approach, broad-ranging in its concerns, and that dazzles us with its unique perspective. We are currently reading from September 1 to November 15, 2017, for our non-themed Summer and Winter online issues.  You may submit up to five poems or three pieces of flash fiction (under 1,000) as a single submission. Limit prose submissions to 8,000 words maximum.

https://witness.blackmountaininstitute.org/submit/

 

Sou’wester Literary Journal

Sou’wester is now accepting submissions for its 2018 annual print issue. Please limit your poetry submission to a maximum of five poems at a time. Please limit your submission of prose to one piece at a time. We will consider a suite of two or three flash pieces. Submissions are open until February 1, 2018.

https://sw.submittable.com/submit

 

New South Journal

Submissions are open from September 1 to March 30. New South seeks to publish high-quality work, regardless of genre, form, or regional ties. We want what’s new, what’s fresh, and what’s different — whether it comes from the southern United States, the south of India, or the north, east or west of anywhere. Submit one story up to 9,000 words in length, or up to five short-shorts under 1,000 words each. Submit up to five poems per document. Submit creative nonfiction or lyric essay up to 9,000 words in length.

https://newsouthjournal.com/submissions/

 

Fugue

Begun in 1990 by the faculty in the Department of English at University of Idaho, Fugue has continuously published poetry, plays, fiction, essays, visual-text hybrids, and interviews from established and emerging writers biannually. Poetry, Fiction and Nonfiction submissions are accepted September 1 through May 1.

http://www.fuguejournal.com/

My CutBank Interview with Keith Lesmeister

Thanks to Barry Maxwell and CutBank Literary Magazine for allowing me to interview my friend Keith Lesmeister about his new collection of stories, We Could’ve Been Happy Here (published by Midwest Gothic Press). Lesmeister lives and works in rural northeast Iowa, and all 12 of these stories explore the contemporary Midwest in some way. Here’s an excerpt from the interview.

DL: I wanted to ask you about the stories all being set in Iowa, which is your home state. The idea of the Mid-West is apparent in a lot of your work, especially in regards to how you create a sense of place to inform and impact your characters. Do you find it easy or difficult to write about this region that you call home?

KL: Very difficult because I’m from here, which means I take a lot for granted. I’ve had to readjust how I interpret my surroundings, thinking of myself like a tourist when I drive around, trying to take it all in. And despite the stereotypes, several parts of Iowa are quite beautiful. That’s been a big surprise for me as I’ve written this collection—how much I truly love the landscape around here.

It’s funny for this to come as a surprise to Lesmeister because when you’re reading his work, it’s pretty obvious how much to loves the place he’s writing about.

There’s also more in the interview about his love of basketball, and there’s some talk about how difficult it can be to herd cattle. Please read the entire piece at CutBank Onlinehttp://www.cutbankonline.org/cutbank-blog/2017/9/cutbank-interviews-keith-lesmeister.

Lesmeister’s fiction and nonfiction have been widely published, and We Could’ve Been Happy Here has received praise from writers such as Benjamin Percy and David Gates. Bret Anthony Johnston said, “These are brutal stories—brutally good, brutally urgent, brutally hopeful.”

Most importantly, be sure to buy the book.  You won’t be sorry.

Keith - full-cover-final-880x629.png

Joanne Proulx’s We All Love the Beautiful Girls

I met Canadian author Joanne Proulx about five years ago.  When we met, she had already published a wonderful novel called Anthem of a Reluctant Prophet, which I fell in love with quickly and deeply and for real.  It’s a beautiful book.  And it’s being made into a major motion film starring Juliette Lewis, Cameron Monaghan, Grayson Gabriel and Alexander MacNicoll.  It’s scheduled for release in 2018, and I can’t wait to watch.

Now Proulx has written another novel, We All Love the Beautiful Girls. I had an opportunity to read an advanced copy of the novel, and it’s so good that it hurts—heartbreaking and full of hope all at the same time.

Joanne Proulx book cover

Robert Wiersema reviewed the book for The Toronto Star, and he gave this synopsis of how the book starts:

Proulx spends the book’s first few pages offering glimpses into what seem nearly blessed lives. Mia and Michael are happily married, with a certain level of financial freedom: Michael is partner in a property management company and Mia, having left a job in banking, is now trying to build a career as a photographer. They might not be able to afford a spontaneous weekend in Whistler, but they own their own home and make do with skiing vacations closer to home in the company of their friends Helen and Peter — Michael’s partner — and their daughter Frankie. Their son, Finn, 17, is a good student, popular, who receives secret nocturnal visits from Jess, the beautiful girl next door, who years before was his babysitter.

Their idyllic lives are shattered, however, with the events of one night in late February. Early that evening, Mia and Michael are informed that not only has Peter been embezzling from the company, he has actually written Michael out of the partnership, stealing the firm out from under him. Later that night, intoxicated and fleeing a debauched house party, Finn passes out in the snow, and loses his right hand to the cold.

While this sounds like it might be the set-up for a standard triumph-against-adversity narrative, a fall-and-rise story, Proulx has something considerably stronger, and subtler, in store. The shifting fortunes of the Slate family put each character through their own individual struggles, pushing them to the breaking point, and beyond.   (Read all of Wiersema’s review here.)

“The book is also about anger and its consequences, both sexual and physical,” says Peter Robb in Ottawa’s artsfile. Robb also reports:

When she was young, Joanne Proulx had a brush with danger. A young man threw her over his shoulder at a party and headed upstairs. It was funny to start and then it wasn’t funny at all. Proulx avoided being sexually assaulted because, she said, she’s a fighter, but many, many women aren’t so fortunate.

The Ottawa writer has taken her own life experiences and those of many others, and built a book, a complex, thoughtful and provocative second novel called We All Love the Beautiful Girls that probes deeply into the lives and relationships of privileged people and those that they hold in their sway.

Proulx says this novel was written in part because she saw a terrifying rise in violence against women all over the world.  “It was always there but the conversation seemed to be moving more to the centre,” she told Robb.  And although this novel is not overtly political, it’s definitely a novel of our current political ad social atmosphere, where anyone who has power will use it regardless of the consequences.  Despite that truth, We All Love the Beautiful Girls is a pleasure to read.  Buy it today.

Recommended Reading 8/4/2017

If you’re looking for something worthwhile to read this weekend, look no further.

Lorraine Comanor’s essay, “The Carnevale Masks,” is online at The Raven’s Perch: http://www.theravensperch.com/the-carnevale-masks-by-lorraine-commanor/

LA Times - X PressAgatha French interviewed the publishers of the new L.A. press X Artists’ Books, and yeah, one of them happens to be Keanu Reeves: http://www.latimes.com/books/la-ca-jc-keanu-reeves-artists-books-20170719-story.html.

Emily Mohn-Slate’s essay, “The Colossal”—about Iris van Herpen, Girls Write Museum and the way art and poetry makes our worlds larger—is in At Length’s art section: http://atlengthmag.com/art/the-colossal-iris-van-herpen-and-girls-write-the-museum/.

Jennifer Stewart Miller has two great poems in The Green Mountains Reviewhttp://greenmountainsreview.com/two-poems-28/.  Here’s a small taste from her poem, “Thirsty Birds:”

You don’t have to believe,
to think there’s something about

the flicker’s up-stretched profile
that’s like a shaft of sunlight

piercing an old church.

Barrett Warner reviewed Keith Lesmeister’s book, We Could’ve Been Happy Here, for Atticus Review: https://atticusreview.org/life-rattling-review-couldve-happy-keith-lesmeister/.  Barrett also has new poems online at Verse Wrights: http://www.versewrights.com/warner-barrett.html, including one called “Rainbow Pig.”  Here’s a few lines from “All the Latest Talk in Paradise Concerning Butterflies:”

This we know: butterflies need milkweed–
their only food—and its poison, their only defense,
 
and we are pitchfork lonely for connection,
the piercing tines make five holes in our lungs.

Fiction lovers won’t want to miss Tiffany Williams’ new short story, “Murmuration,” in Appalachian Heritage: http://appalachianheritage.net/2017/05/26/murmuration/.

And if you haven’t seen it yet, check out the new issue of The Tishman Reviewhttp://www.thetishmanreview.com/.

Submission Calls for Writers 8/3/2017

submissions

While some journals are closing their summer reading periods, others are just opening this month. Either way, it’s a great time to send out your work.  Here are a dozen opportunities for writers.  Actually, here’s a baker’s dozen.  Please feel free to share with other writers.  And if you find this list helpful, please leave a comment.  I’d love to hear from you.

n+1

n+1 is a print and digital magazine of literature, culture, and politics published three times a year. We also post new online-only work several times each week and publish books expanding on the interests of the magazine. We welcome submissions from all writers. New fiction, essays, criticism, and translation may be submitted. We currently do not accept poetry, art, illustration, or interview submissions. We place a strong emphasis on publishing work by and about living authors.

https://nplusonemag.com/contact/

 

Compose: A Journal of Simply Good Writing

Compose Journal is seeking literary fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, features, and artwork. We read submissions year-round. Fiction and creative non-fiction submissions should not exceed 4500 words. Submit up to six previously unpublished poems, all in one document. We publish work by established and emerging writers, and past contributors have included William Logan, Ada Limón, Robert Vivian, Marion Roach Smith and Ian Duhig.

http://composejournal.com/submissions/

 

Second Hand Stories

Second Hand Stories is an up-and-coming podcast where we plan to read short works of fiction submitted by our listener community. Our goals are twofold: we would like to give new and under-published writers an opportunity for their works to be heard, and we would like to bring fiction back to its original form as an oral tradition in an affordable alternative to audiobook services. We’re looking for any genre of fiction (no poetry) and our word limit is flexible (preferably between 2,000 and 6,000 words).

http://www.secondhandpodcast.com/guidelines/

 

Ruminate

Ruminate is reading general magazine submissions through August 14, 2017. We accept pieces that are 5,500 words or less. General magazine submissions are always free—there is no entry fee. We currently pay $15/400 words for prose. Ruminate firmly believes in paying our contributors, and we are working hard to increase the amount we pay them.

https://www.ruminatemagazine.com/pages/submissions?mc_cid=bcf2af3af4&mc_eid=508eb4b613

 

The Brighthorse Book Prizes

The Brighthorse Book Prize is an annual awards series honoring unpublished novels, collections of short fiction, and poetry collections. Three prizes will be given in 2017. Authors writing in English—regardless of nationality, residence, or publication history—may submit to the competition. Winning manuscripts will be published by Brighthorse Books. In addition to the $1,000 prize and publication in each category, the winning writers will split net profits on book sales 50/50 (most commercial publishers give the writer only 10% of net). The editors reserve the right to offer to publish any manuscripts submitted to the competition in addition to the prize winners. Submissions are accepted through August 16, 2017. Winners will be announced on October 1, 2017. And the winning manuscripts will be published in December 2017.

https://brighthorsebooks.submittable.com/submit

 

Tinderbox Editions

Tinderbox Editions is currently accepting nonfiction and hybrid manuscripts. Tinderbox Editions is a small, non-profit publisher located in Minnesota. We seek to publish literary prose and poetry and expand books beyond the neat category. Tinderbox is in its second year as a publisher and in addition to the collection of personal essays we’ve published this year (As If Seen at an Angle by Kevin O’Rourke), we are also adding to our line up a poet’s novel by Laynie Browne, a collection of prose poems by Charles Jensen, a lyric essay anthology, and a collection of essays by Carley Moore (among many beautiful books of poetry). Tinderbox will read prose and hybrid manuscripts through the end of August.

https://tinderboxeditions.submittable.com/submit

 

Qu

Qu is a literary journal, published by the MFA program at Queens University of Charlotte. The Qu editorial staff is comprised of current students. We publish fiction, poetry, essays and script excerpts of outstanding quality. Prose submissions (fiction, essays, script excerpts) should be a maximum of 8000 words. Poetry submissions may include up to 3 poems. Payment upon publication is $100 per prose piece and $50 per poem. Deadline is August 31st, 2017.

http://www.qulitmag.com/submit/

 

Anomaly (formerly Drunken Boat)

Anomaly is the new (as of May 2017) incarnation of the now-defunct Drunken Boat, founded in 1999, maintaining continuous publication without interruption, with a focus on especially innovative and experimental literature and arts. General submissions in poetry, fiction, nonfiction, comics, and translation are open through September 1, 2017. Submit one story or essay at a time of no more than 5000 words. Submit up to five poems in a single document.  We try to respond within two months.

http://anmly.org/submit

 

Consequence 2017 Women Writing War Awards in Fiction and Poetry

Consequence Magazine seeks submissions for the 2017 Women Writing War Awards in Fiction and Poetry. $250 Honorarium and Publication. FICTION JUDGE: Siobhan Fallon. POETRY JUDGE: Danielle Legros Georges. The contests are open to women and those identifying as women. Entries must capture the nuances of the cultures and consequences of war.  The $10 contest entry fee is non-refundable. SUBMIT: July 1, 2017 – October 1, 2017.

http://www.consequencemagazine.org/contests/

 

Little Patuxent Review

Little Patuxent Review is a community-based publication focused on writers and artists from the Mid-Atlantic region, but all excellent work originating in the United States will be considered. The submission period for the next issue of Little Patuxent Review will close on October 24th, 2017. The issue is unthemed. You may submit one fiction piece of no more than 5,000 words, one nonfiction piece of no more than 3,500 words, or a maximum of three poems of up to 100 lines each.

https://littlepatuxentreview.org/submissions/

 

Cream City Review

We devote ourselves to publishing memorable and energetic fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and artwork which represent a broad range of creators with diverse, unique backgrounds. Both beginning and well-known writers are welcome. We are currently reading for our Fall/Winter Issue from now through November 1, 2017. For Fiction and Nonfiction, send fewer than twenty pages. We are interested in dynamic, well-crafted nonfiction, including creative journalism, personal essays, travelogues, flash, and polemics. We seek book reviews of any ccr-published genre and relevant author interviews. Please submit no more than five poems at a time

http://uwm.edu/creamcityreview/submit/

 

Bat City Review

BCR is published annually. We accept and read submissions from Aug 1 to May 1, with responses sent primarily in late autumn. We are interested in poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction (personal essays, memoir, commentary) that experiments with language, form, and unconventional subject matter, as well as more traditional work. Send us writing that plays, that strikes out, that enjoys itself, that makes its own rules.

http://www.batcityreview.la.utexas.edu/guidelines.php

 

Exit 7

Exit 7 accepts unsolicited submissions of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry from August 1—May 1 of each year. We ask that your fiction and nonfiction submissions not exceed 5,000 words. Please send 3—6 poems.

http://westkentucky.kctcs.edu/Student_Life/Exit7/Submit.aspx

Recommended Non-fiction Reading 7/24/2017

I don’t know if it’s something in the air or the water, but I’ve read some really wonderful nonfiction pieces lately, and I wanted to share them.

After the birth of her children, Emily Mohn-Slate had trouble finding her way back to herself.  Check out her essay at Rackedhttps://www.racked.com/2017/6/19/15757368/motherhood-bodies-postpartum-clothes .

If I told you, “She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted,” you might think I was speaking about Elizabeth Warren, but I’m actually talking about Megan Culhane Galbraith.  She writes about how divine rules were meant to be broken for The Coachella Reviewhttp://thecoachellareview.com/wordpress/talking-points/

I love to read book reviews and interviews, especially when they are smart and insightful.  K.L. Brown interviewed Brad Listi over at Entropyhttps://entropymag.org/otherppl-with-brad-listi-an-interview-with-the-interviewer-of-todays-leading-writers/

And Cassie Pruyn reviewed Joshua Jennifer Espinoza’s second book, There Should Be Flowers, for Blackbird: http://www.blackbird.vcu.edu/v16n1/nonfiction/pruyn-c/flowers_page.shtml#.WUqxKA_P-PU.facebook.

Cassie Pruyn has her own book of poetry, Lena, that was recently released by Texas Tech University Press.  If you don’t own it yet, you really should buy it immediately. I’ll be sharing more about this beautiful collection soon, but as a teaser, check out this mention at Rosemary and Reading Glasseshttps://rosemaryandreadingglasses.com/2017/07/18/recommended-reading-lena-by-cassie-pruyn/.

Lena cover