Submission Calls for Writers 8/6/2019

submissions

This month, I’ve compiled a list of 12 opportunities. Whether it’s a call for a magazine or a post for an editorial position, good luck!

 

Typo Magazine

Typo is currently open for submissions. Please send three to ten poems.

https://typo.submittable.com/submit

 

Fiction and NonFiction Editorial Positions at Orison Books (Volunteer Positions)

Orison Books is seeking fiction and nonfiction editors. Orison Books is a non-profit literary press focused on exceptional literature that engages the life of the spirit from a broad and inclusive range of perspectives. We are a labor of love, so the editorial positions are on a volunteer basis. If you have experience as a fiction or nonfiction author and/or editor and are interested in this opportunity, please write Luke Hankins at editor (AT) orisonbooks (DOT) com. People of color, members of the LGBTQ community, and the differently abled are encouraged to apply. www.orisonbooks.com

 

Sundress Seeking Development Director (Volunteer Position)

An extension of Sundress Publications, the Sundress Academy for the Arts (SAFTA) is an artists’ residency on a 45-acre farm in Knoxville, Tennessee, that offers residencies to writers in all genres including literary, nonfiction, journalism, and academic. With two residency rooms and a dry cabin on site, we offer a rotating space for nationally recognized and emerging artists in multiple disciplines. SAFTA also hosts weekend workshops, a reading series, and yearly retreats. This position will run for one year from your start date with a chance to be renewed the following year. The development director’s responsibilities includes working with a team of interns and other directors to research grant opportunities, draft potential grants, coordinate between SAFTA department heads, work with our budget office, and lead a team of two to four people to write, edit, and submit national, regional, and local grants. To apply, please send a resume and a brief cover letter detailing your interest in the position to Erin Elizabeth Smith at erin (AT) sundresspublications (DOT) com by August 15, 2019.

www.sundresspublications.com

 

Whitefish Review

For Issue #24, Whitefish Review seeks essays, fiction, poetry, art, photography, and songwriting about our awakenings and our teachers. We will accept submissions through August 15, 2019.

https://whitefishreview.submittable.com/submit

 

Show Us Your Papers Anthology

Send us your poems about writs and wills. About medical charts and shift logs, foreclosures and permits. About being identified, misidentified, lost. About identity theft, deportation, detention. About being documented. About not being safe even with the right documents. We are “permitted” by the right paperwork, or so we imagine. Identity theft, fraud, a bad marriage, and a host of other mishaps can complicate the link between our “identity” and our “papers.” Sometimes no amount of paperwork “permits” a life, as when a black man is shot by police before he can reach into his wallet, or Latinx immigrants are jailed or deported because new administration changes the “rules.” To be published by Main Street Rag. Submissions close August 31, 2019.

www.showusyourpapers.info and

https://showusyrpapers.submittable.com/submit/129360/show-us-your-papers-anthology

 

museum of americana

the museum of americana accepts submissions of original fiction, nonfiction, poetry, book/chapbook reviews, writer interviews, music, photography, and art. We seek work that showcases and/or repurposes historical American culture. This is, of course, an enormous and diverse tub of spare parts, and we want to see if you can turn them into a hot rod. August is an open reading month, so have a look at our guidelines, and send us your best by month’s end—and don’t forget, we’ll be reading submissions of humor, too.

https://themuseumofamericana.net/submissions/

 

Change Seven

Change Seven, an online literary journal, seeks submissions for an official relaunch in Fall 2019. The editors seek poetry, prose, artwork, photography, multimedia, and book reviews from both new and established talents. We most enjoy writing that comes from experience, is well-crafted, lyrical, distinctive, and accessible. Give us something that in some way resonates with us deeply like only the human heart in conflict with itself knows how to do. Open submission period through August 31, 2019. https://changesevenmag.com/submissions/

 

Talking Writing

We’re looking for short personal essays or first-person features that grapple with transitions of all kinds: from one stage of life to the next; across artistic genres; in work and daily life; in belief; in the natural world, cities, or neighborhoods. We’ll consider a mix of visual art and text on this theme as well, but no political diatribes, life hacks, or lyrical experiments. Feel free to query us first about the subject for your essay or feature. Word count: 500 to 1,500. Deadline: Sept 9, 2019.

https://talkingwriting.submittable.com/submit/133895/theme-essays-transitions

 

MacDowell Colony Residency

The MacDowell Colony is accepting applications for residencies between Feb 1 – May 31, 2020. The colony provides time, space, and an inspiring environment to artists of exceptional talent. A MacDowell Fellowship, or residency, consists of exclusive use of a studio, accommodations, and three prepared meals a day for up to eight weeks. There are no residency fees aside from a nonrefundable processing fee of $30 (U.S.) which is required with each application. Include a 10-page writing sample completed within the past two years, related as closely as possible to the proposed project. Upload a PDF file of a one-page Executive Summary of your C.V. Applicants who are enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs as of the date of application are ineligible to apply. Doctoral candidates who have finished all coursework may apply. Artists are responsible for the cost of travel to and from the Colony. We are pleased to offer stipends to artists in all artistic disciplines so that they may take advantage of a residency at the Colony. Funding is also available to help reimburse artists for costs associated with travel, including shipping of materials. Financial aid forms are available upon acceptance and aid is awarded based on need. Deadline: Sept 15, 2019.

https://macdowell.slideroom.com/#/Login

 

Salt Hill Journal

Salt Hill is now accepting fiction, nonfiction and poetry submissions. We are interested in work that shines, work that represents a broad spectrum of experience, and work that makes us feel in new and exciting ways. Please submit no more than five poems at a time, and no more than thirty pages of prose. Send us your most honest work. We will consider all nonfiction, but are most interested in creative nonfiction, including personal essays, lyric essays, memoir, literary journalism, and other literary forms. Deadline: Sept 30, 2019.

https://salthilljournal.net/submit

 

Writers in Paradise Conference

Located on the beautiful waterfront campus of Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida, this writers’ conference features professional writers at the top of their form spending quality time with motivated and talented participants seeking an intimate, unhurried climate for learning…in paradise.

2020 workshops will be led by Gregory Pardlo, Michael Koryta, Laura Lippman, Stewart O’Nan, Andre Dubus III, John Dufresne, Stephanie Elizondo Griest, Ann Hood, Les Standiford and Sterling Watson. Dozens of fellowships and scholarships are available. Apply by November 1, 2019.

https://www.writersinparadise.com/

 

The Mildred Haun Conference Call for Papers

The 11th Annual Mildred Haun Conference invites papers that consider, but are not limited to, the following broad areas of interest: Conference theme: “Of Jack Tales and Sleeping Birds: Youth, Literacy and Appalachia;” Mildred Haun’s The Hawk’s Done Gone and other stories; scholarship related to any of the following: classic and contemporary Appalachian literature, including poetry, the novel, short fiction, nonfiction and film; multiculturalism in Appalachia; personal and cultural stories associated with Appalachia; treatment of stereotypes in Appalachian literature and popular culture; creative writing and publication; art or music projects/presentation. Submit abstracts (not exceeding 350 words) along with a brief third-person bio (not exceeding 150 words) before November 1, 2019.

https://www.ws.edu/special-events/mildred-haun/papers/default.shtm

Advertisements

Submission Calls for Writers 1/3/2019

submissions

I didn’t make specific resolutions this year, but I do have goals for 2019. Mostly, I hope to just keep writing and submitting. I hope you will do the same. Here are ten opportunities for writers. Check them out, and have a happy new year!

One

One, the online literary journal of Jacar Press,

One reads submissions of poems continually. There is no deadline. To submit, send one poem in the body of an email to <onejacarATgmailDOTcom.> In a few short years, poems first published in One have won a Best of the Net, received an Honorable Mention, been reprinted in the New York Times. We publish the best works by Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winners, as well as newcomers and established poets from Africa, Asia, South America, the Middle East, Europe, the U.K. and the U.S.

http://one.jacarpress.com/submissions/

 

The Offing: Back of the Envelope

Back of the Envelope seeks writing of any length which relates to, or draws on, science and the natural world. Sharing its wonder or its horrors, relating the untold stories of discovery, or toying with everyday curiosities, we’re interested in hearing from those inside and outside the scientific community.

https://theoffingmag.submittable.com/submit

 

Oxford American

We welcome fiction submissions for our Summer 2019 issue. We are eager to feature a writer whose fiction has not yet been published in a major print publication. Stories under 10,000 words will be considered, and the selected writer will be paid $1000. Deadline January 15.  $5 submission fee.

https://oxfordamerican.submittable.com/submit/126851/debut-fiction-in-summer-2019-issue-open-only-to-new-writers

 

Longleaf Writers Conference Fellowships

The Longleaf Writers Conference is an annual gathering of creative writers from all over the nation and features award-winning writers in poetry and fiction and creative nonfiction who will offer a full week of intensive writing workshops, one day seminars, lectures, readings, and social events.  Fellows benefit from a special reading, direct work with faculty, and other specific duties that allow them access to our faculty and visiting writers. Fellowship applicants must have at least one book published in the last six years and should be actively publishing work in established literary magazines and/or have other awards of merit. This fellowship covers full tuition (all events, readings, workshops, etc. are covered for fellow) for the conference as well as superb lodging near one of the most beautiful beaches in Seaside, Florida, during the Longleaf Writers Conference from May 11-19, 2019. Past Fellows include Brandon Courtney, Rachel Weaver, Eugene Garcia-Cross, Andrew McFadyen-Ketchum, Stacey Balkin, Karin Lin-Greenberg, Erika Krouse, Sandra Gail Lambert, Blake Sanz, many more! DEADLINE: January 10, 2019. 

www.longleafwritersconference.com

 

Landlocked

LandLocked Magazine is a reinvention of Beecher’s Magazine. We love found pieces, eco-poetics, works about displacement, and stories of how your body fits (or how it doesn’t) into the world. Imagism and hybrid genres, including experimental and visual works, lyric essays, and prose poems are all welcome. Please send 3–5 poems per submission with no more than 10 pages in total. We want stories of literary quality and encourage fantastic, speculative, and weird literature. Send us your most imaginative and challenging writing in 4,000 words or less. We also encourage flash fiction of 1,000 words or less. Finally, we are especially drawn to nonfiction pieces that challenge the boundaries of the genre, incorporate fictional and poetic elements, and make us question how “creative” nonfiction can be. As far as length, we prefer under 4,000 words. Submit by February 01, 2019.

https://landlockedmagazine.com/submission-guidelines/?mc_cid=85cbcdeaa3&mc_eid=508eb4b613

 

10th Annual Spirit First Meditation Poetry Contest

Spirit First is pleased to announce its 10th Annual Meditation Poetry Contest. Poetry submissions may be of any length and any style but must have a theme of Meditation or Mindfulness. Poems may reflect any discipline, any faith, or none. Poems must be previously unpublished. Poems not on the themes of meditation, mindfulness, stillness, or sacred silence will not be included in this meditation poetry event. Enter up to three submissions. Please submit your poems all in one file or inside the body of an email (rather than three poems in three separate files). Be sure to include the author’s name, address, telephone number, and email address. There is no cost to enter this contest. Submissions must be received no later than February 28, 2019. There is NO FEE to submit.

http://www.spiritfirst.org/poetry_contest2019Entry.html

 

Cincinnati Review

The Cincinnati Review welcomes submissions from writers at any point in their careers. Please submit up to five poems, which should total no more than ten manuscript pages, at a time. Fiction submissions should be no more than forty double-spaced pages. We’re interested mostly in pieces of nonfiction less than twenty double-spaced pages, though you can try us for longer pieces if you think they’ll knock our socks off. We read until March 1, 2019, with an exception: miCRo submissions are open year-round. https://www.cincinnatireview.com/submission_guidelines/

 

Arkana Call for Submissions: The Micro Issue

For our Micro Issue, Arkana invites you to magnify the microscopic. Once called “little magazines,” literary journals have long been interested in cultivating small-scale communities and promoting the work of authors and editors toiling on their art outside of national markets. For Arkana’s Micro Issue, we’re commemorating this heritage while seeking work that packs a punch in pint-sized form. From nanotechnology, the singularity at the center of a black hole, microbiology, and microbursts to microbreweries, “The Itsy Bitsy Spider,” Hershey’s miniatures, Little Rock, and Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, we want work that celebrates its smallness, amplifies the tiniest voices with the most to say, and challenges society’s perceptions of the marginal, modest, and miniscule. Send us up to 500 words of fiction or creative nonfiction, 10 lines of poetry, 4 panels of illustrated narrative, or 5 minute scripts for the stage or screen. In addition to publication in the Micro Issue, each piece will be considered for $50.00 Editor’s Choice Awards in each genre. The deadline for Issue 6 is March 31, 2019.

https://arkanamag.org/submit/

 

Blackbird

Send up to six poems at a time. Single-space, please. For fiction, double-space, please. We primarily look for short stories, but novel excerpts are acceptable if self-contained. Double-space nonfiction also. We primarily look for personal essays, but memoir excerpts are acceptable if self-contained. Unsolicited book reviews and criticism are not considered. Send one prose piece or two to six poems at a time, and please submit genres separately. Blackbird does not accept previously published work. Simultaneous submissions are acceptable so long as they are indicated as such and we are immediately notified upon acceptance elsewhere. Current reading period ends April 15, 2019.

https://blackbird.vcu.edu/v15n1/submissions.shtml

 

Quarter After Eight

Quarter After Eight is devoted to the exploration of innovative writing. We accept submissions in any genre from new and established writers through April 15, 2019. You may submit up to four poems at one time. Submit one essay or up to three flash prose pieces. You may submit one story or up to three flash prose pieces at one time.

http://www.quarteraftereight.org/submit.html

My 2018 Reading List

I love to read, but I struggle constantly with my own expectations of how and what to read and specifically with how much to read. The struggle comes to a head about this time of year when I look back and make some kind of judgment about how I spent my limited time and energy. For 2018, I ended up reading 52 books, obviously, an average of one per week, although it wasn’t paced out that way at all.

Dorie and Book Shelf
Seen here, my cat Dorie picks out her next book to read.

Does it matter? Does the number of books I’ve read make me a better person? Does it make me a better writer? There’s some science to back up both possibilities. But more importantly, I enjoy reading. I love a book that captures me with its language and its characters, and yeah, a great narrative helps too.

Two of the books I loved the most this past year are Jacob Shores-Arguello’s In the Absence of Clocks and John Brandon’s Further Joy. Neither writer was familiar to me when I came across their work in magazines. Arguello’s poetry was found in The New Yorker, and I found a short story by Brandon in Oxford American. Both journal pieces blew me away. I felt so lucky to discover that each had books that were as thoroughly good as their individual publications.

Here’s the list of all 52 books I read this year. I’d love to see what you read in 2018. And I’d love to year which books were your favorites and which ones will stick with you.

1. Russell Banks – A Permanent Member of the Family
2. Virgil – Eclogues
3. Julia Cameron – The Artist’s Way
4. Laura Hunter – Beloved Mother
5. Elaine Fletcher Chapman – Hunger For Salt
6. Jacob Shores-Arguello – In the Absence of Clocks
7. Michael Dowdy – Urbilly
8. Eric Shonkwiler – Moon Up, Past Full
9. William Shakespeare – The Merchant of Venice
10. Marie Howe – What the Living Do
11. Robert Pinsky – At the Foundling Hospital (Feb)
12. William Shakespeare – As You Like It
13. Marie Howe – The Good Thief
14. Jacob Shores-Arguello – Paraiso
15. Madeline Ffitch – Valparaiso, Round the Horn
16. Susan Goldsmith Wooldridge – Poemcrazy
17. Todd Boss – Tough Luck: Poems
18. Walt Whitman – Song of Myself (Mar)
19. Marc Harshman – Believe What You Can
20. Rita Quillen – The Mad Farmer’s Wife
21. Linda Parsons Marion – This Shaky Earth
22. Greg Wrenn – Centaur
23. John Brandon – Further Joy
24. John Lane – Anthropocene Blues
25. Larry Thacker – Drifting in Awe
26. Rachel Danielle Peterson – A Girl’s A Gun
27. Michael Knight – The Holiday Season
28. Jia Oak Baker – Well Enough to Travel
29. James M. Gifford – Jesse Stuart, Immortal Kentuckian
30. Manuel Gonzales – The Miniature Wife
31. Sharon Kay Penman – Falls the Shadow
32. Crystal Wilkinson – The Birds of Opulence
33. James Herriot – All Things Wise and Wonderful
34. Ottessa Moshfegh – My Year of Rest and Relaxation
35. Rowling, Tiffany & Thorne – Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
36. William Glasser – Choice Theory
37. James Herriot – All Creatures Great and Small
38. Sylvia Lynch – Jack Lord: An Acting Life
39. Kevin Fitton – Dropping Ballast (manuscript)
40. Jane Smiley – A Thousand Acres
41. Stephen Mitchell – Gilgamesh
42. C.D. Wright – One with Others
43. Kevin Canty – Into the Great Wide Open
44. George Eliot – Silas Marner
45. Michael Kardos – The Three-Day Affair
46. Christopher Smith – Salamanders of the Silk Road
47. Grant Faulkner, Lynn Mundell, Beret Olsen – Nothing Short of 100
48. Maureen Seaton – Fisher
49. Amy D. Clark – Success in Hill Country
50. Langston Hughes – Let America Be America Again and other poems
51. Cassie Pruyn – Lena
52. Kathryn Stripling Byer – Catching Light

Recommended Reading 2/2/2018 – Short Stories

The best part about January being so long and cold was that it was a great time to read.  It was literally too cold to do anything else. February is starting off the same way. If you’re stuck inside this weekend and not sure what to read, here are some of the short stories I read last month. Try one or two or more.

“No Good” by Hala Alyan

“Freezer Burn” by Ron Austin

“Shine” by Ron Austin

“August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains” by Ray Bradbury

“The Ceiling” by Kevin Brockmeier

demonman-1-768x461

“Demonman” by Julialicia Case is an amazing story that appeared online this month at The Master’s Review. Here’s how it begins:

“I am eleven the spring Demonman comes, first to the alley behind the Kroger, where the dumpsters reek like fermented orange juice, then to the train tracks by the boarded-up video store, then to the Harding mansion, still for sale, then to a snot-colored van with flattened tires. He comes to our nightmares, our whispered worries, to newspapers and televisions and notices in the post office. He’s called something else, a different name, although, of course, he is still Demonman. Since the shootings upstate, the police struggle with the race riots, but they claim to be searching for him, following the leads.”

“Expensive Lessons” by Anton Chekhov

“These Certain Young People” by Dave Eggers

First Night

“First Night” by Kevin Fitton appeared online this month at Storgy. I loved reading this story that covers a large emotional range but still manages to impart some humor. Here’s how it begins:

“It was the morning of New Year’s Eve, and a dull light confessed the start of another winter day. In Vermont this time of year, the days were short. It was dark when Brian woke in the morning for work and dark when he drove home from the office. It was the time of year Vermonters did their best to survive by taking vacations to the Caribbean, talking to their therapist, and drinking. The night before it was snowing when he went to sleep, and Brian dreamt that the roof was covered with two feet of heavy snow. In his dream, he could feel the house sweating as it tried to hold the weight, could hear the rafters cracking under their burden—pop, pop, pop, like the last kernels of corn on the stove.”

“The Miniature Wife” by Manuel Gonzalez

“Mermaid in the Jar” by Sheila Heti

“Plan B” by Michele Johnson

 “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien

“My Name is Jean-Pierre and I am Still an End Table” by Dana Schwartz

“Saying Goodbye to Yang” by Alexander Weinstein

 

If you’ve read a great short story lately, please tell me about it in the comments.

Eric Shonkwiler’s Moon Up, Past Full

Frank Bill may have said it best when he said that Eric Shonkwiler “has an eye for detail and a lot of heart. His words stay with you.”

I picked up Shonkwiler’s collection of novellas and stories, Moon Up, Past Full, when I was in Washington DC in 2017 for AWP.  For the rest of the year, the book sat at the top of my to-read pile, but I was having a hard time reading anything. When I finally picked the book up this week, it was like taking a shot of good whiskey—smoother than you could hope for and over quicker than you want it to be.

MUPFfc

I admire this book and Shonkwiler’s writing so much.  His stories are perfectly balanced between character and action. His imagery is great. His language has some beautifully poetic turns but is also perfectly precise. So much happens in each story that even the shorter pieces feel completely developed and novelistic in scope. However, it is in the longer works in this collection where Shonkwiler really shines.

The longest piece in the collection, “GO21,”—an apocalypse-type story that I didn’t want to end—was also one of my favorites. The story works on so many levels.  It’s a must read.

Another favorite was the story, “Rene,” originally serialized in three parts online at Fiddleblack. Rene is a young woman on a horse with a sick mother.  Like all of Shonkwiler’s stories, the complications keep adding up as the story goes along. Unlike most of the other pieces, Shonkwiler is exploring issues of race and class in this story. I highly recommend you click the link and read the story for yourself.

It’s not by any means one of the longest stories in the collection, but “My Wakeup” is probably my absolute favorite of these stories.  The story was originally published online at Splinter Generation, and again, I recommend you read it now. Like Shonkwiler’s other work, this story is detailed and deceptively simple.  It starts off with Geier, an Iraq war vet, on his return home from the base in Kuwait. Once back and unsure of what to do with himself, he hooks up with another former soldier, Jones, and the two take a road trip cross country.  Some of the drinking and drugging and whoring might be predicable, but (like all of Shonkwiler’s stories) the feeling behind it all feels tragically sincere which makes it unique. And beautiful. And well worth the read.

For more about Eric Shonkwiler and his writing, check out his webpage: http://www.ericshonkwiler.com/.  Follow him on Twitter: @eshonkwiler