Submission Calls for Writers 8/6/2019

submissions

This month, I’ve compiled a list of 12 opportunities. Whether it’s a call for a magazine or a post for an editorial position, good luck!

 

Typo Magazine

Typo is currently open for submissions. Please send three to ten poems.

https://typo.submittable.com/submit

 

Fiction and NonFiction Editorial Positions at Orison Books (Volunteer Positions)

Orison Books is seeking fiction and nonfiction editors. Orison Books is a non-profit literary press focused on exceptional literature that engages the life of the spirit from a broad and inclusive range of perspectives. We are a labor of love, so the editorial positions are on a volunteer basis. If you have experience as a fiction or nonfiction author and/or editor and are interested in this opportunity, please write Luke Hankins at editor (AT) orisonbooks (DOT) com. People of color, members of the LGBTQ community, and the differently abled are encouraged to apply. www.orisonbooks.com

 

Sundress Seeking Development Director (Volunteer Position)

An extension of Sundress Publications, the Sundress Academy for the Arts (SAFTA) is an artists’ residency on a 45-acre farm in Knoxville, Tennessee, that offers residencies to writers in all genres including literary, nonfiction, journalism, and academic. With two residency rooms and a dry cabin on site, we offer a rotating space for nationally recognized and emerging artists in multiple disciplines. SAFTA also hosts weekend workshops, a reading series, and yearly retreats. This position will run for one year from your start date with a chance to be renewed the following year. The development director’s responsibilities includes working with a team of interns and other directors to research grant opportunities, draft potential grants, coordinate between SAFTA department heads, work with our budget office, and lead a team of two to four people to write, edit, and submit national, regional, and local grants. To apply, please send a resume and a brief cover letter detailing your interest in the position to Erin Elizabeth Smith at erin (AT) sundresspublications (DOT) com by August 15, 2019.

www.sundresspublications.com

 

Whitefish Review

For Issue #24, Whitefish Review seeks essays, fiction, poetry, art, photography, and songwriting about our awakenings and our teachers. We will accept submissions through August 15, 2019.

https://whitefishreview.submittable.com/submit

 

Show Us Your Papers Anthology

Send us your poems about writs and wills. About medical charts and shift logs, foreclosures and permits. About being identified, misidentified, lost. About identity theft, deportation, detention. About being documented. About not being safe even with the right documents. We are “permitted” by the right paperwork, or so we imagine. Identity theft, fraud, a bad marriage, and a host of other mishaps can complicate the link between our “identity” and our “papers.” Sometimes no amount of paperwork “permits” a life, as when a black man is shot by police before he can reach into his wallet, or Latinx immigrants are jailed or deported because new administration changes the “rules.” To be published by Main Street Rag. Submissions close August 31, 2019.

www.showusyourpapers.info and

https://showusyrpapers.submittable.com/submit/129360/show-us-your-papers-anthology

 

museum of americana

the museum of americana accepts submissions of original fiction, nonfiction, poetry, book/chapbook reviews, writer interviews, music, photography, and art. We seek work that showcases and/or repurposes historical American culture. This is, of course, an enormous and diverse tub of spare parts, and we want to see if you can turn them into a hot rod. August is an open reading month, so have a look at our guidelines, and send us your best by month’s end—and don’t forget, we’ll be reading submissions of humor, too.

https://themuseumofamericana.net/submissions/

 

Change Seven

Change Seven, an online literary journal, seeks submissions for an official relaunch in Fall 2019. The editors seek poetry, prose, artwork, photography, multimedia, and book reviews from both new and established talents. We most enjoy writing that comes from experience, is well-crafted, lyrical, distinctive, and accessible. Give us something that in some way resonates with us deeply like only the human heart in conflict with itself knows how to do. Open submission period through August 31, 2019. https://changesevenmag.com/submissions/

 

Talking Writing

We’re looking for short personal essays or first-person features that grapple with transitions of all kinds: from one stage of life to the next; across artistic genres; in work and daily life; in belief; in the natural world, cities, or neighborhoods. We’ll consider a mix of visual art and text on this theme as well, but no political diatribes, life hacks, or lyrical experiments. Feel free to query us first about the subject for your essay or feature. Word count: 500 to 1,500. Deadline: Sept 9, 2019.

https://talkingwriting.submittable.com/submit/133895/theme-essays-transitions

 

MacDowell Colony Residency

The MacDowell Colony is accepting applications for residencies between Feb 1 – May 31, 2020. The colony provides time, space, and an inspiring environment to artists of exceptional talent. A MacDowell Fellowship, or residency, consists of exclusive use of a studio, accommodations, and three prepared meals a day for up to eight weeks. There are no residency fees aside from a nonrefundable processing fee of $30 (U.S.) which is required with each application. Include a 10-page writing sample completed within the past two years, related as closely as possible to the proposed project. Upload a PDF file of a one-page Executive Summary of your C.V. Applicants who are enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs as of the date of application are ineligible to apply. Doctoral candidates who have finished all coursework may apply. Artists are responsible for the cost of travel to and from the Colony. We are pleased to offer stipends to artists in all artistic disciplines so that they may take advantage of a residency at the Colony. Funding is also available to help reimburse artists for costs associated with travel, including shipping of materials. Financial aid forms are available upon acceptance and aid is awarded based on need. Deadline: Sept 15, 2019.

https://macdowell.slideroom.com/#/Login

 

Salt Hill Journal

Salt Hill is now accepting fiction, nonfiction and poetry submissions. We are interested in work that shines, work that represents a broad spectrum of experience, and work that makes us feel in new and exciting ways. Please submit no more than five poems at a time, and no more than thirty pages of prose. Send us your most honest work. We will consider all nonfiction, but are most interested in creative nonfiction, including personal essays, lyric essays, memoir, literary journalism, and other literary forms. Deadline: Sept 30, 2019.

https://salthilljournal.net/submit

 

Writers in Paradise Conference

Located on the beautiful waterfront campus of Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida, this writers’ conference features professional writers at the top of their form spending quality time with motivated and talented participants seeking an intimate, unhurried climate for learning…in paradise.

2020 workshops will be led by Gregory Pardlo, Michael Koryta, Laura Lippman, Stewart O’Nan, Andre Dubus III, John Dufresne, Stephanie Elizondo Griest, Ann Hood, Les Standiford and Sterling Watson. Dozens of fellowships and scholarships are available. Apply by November 1, 2019.

https://www.writersinparadise.com/

 

The Mildred Haun Conference Call for Papers

The 11th Annual Mildred Haun Conference invites papers that consider, but are not limited to, the following broad areas of interest: Conference theme: “Of Jack Tales and Sleeping Birds: Youth, Literacy and Appalachia;” Mildred Haun’s The Hawk’s Done Gone and other stories; scholarship related to any of the following: classic and contemporary Appalachian literature, including poetry, the novel, short fiction, nonfiction and film; multiculturalism in Appalachia; personal and cultural stories associated with Appalachia; treatment of stereotypes in Appalachian literature and popular culture; creative writing and publication; art or music projects/presentation. Submit abstracts (not exceeding 350 words) along with a brief third-person bio (not exceeding 150 words) before November 1, 2019.

https://www.ws.edu/special-events/mildred-haun/papers/default.shtm

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My 2018 Reading List

I love to read, but I struggle constantly with my own expectations of how and what to read and specifically with how much to read. The struggle comes to a head about this time of year when I look back and make some kind of judgment about how I spent my limited time and energy. For 2018, I ended up reading 52 books, obviously, an average of one per week, although it wasn’t paced out that way at all.

Dorie and Book Shelf
Seen here, my cat Dorie picks out her next book to read.

Does it matter? Does the number of books I’ve read make me a better person? Does it make me a better writer? There’s some science to back up both possibilities. But more importantly, I enjoy reading. I love a book that captures me with its language and its characters, and yeah, a great narrative helps too.

Two of the books I loved the most this past year are Jacob Shores-Arguello’s In the Absence of Clocks and John Brandon’s Further Joy. Neither writer was familiar to me when I came across their work in magazines. Arguello’s poetry was found in The New Yorker, and I found a short story by Brandon in Oxford American. Both journal pieces blew me away. I felt so lucky to discover that each had books that were as thoroughly good as their individual publications.

Here’s the list of all 52 books I read this year. I’d love to see what you read in 2018. And I’d love to year which books were your favorites and which ones will stick with you.

1. Russell Banks – A Permanent Member of the Family
2. Virgil – Eclogues
3. Julia Cameron – The Artist’s Way
4. Laura Hunter – Beloved Mother
5. Elaine Fletcher Chapman – Hunger For Salt
6. Jacob Shores-Arguello – In the Absence of Clocks
7. Michael Dowdy – Urbilly
8. Eric Shonkwiler – Moon Up, Past Full
9. William Shakespeare – The Merchant of Venice
10. Marie Howe – What the Living Do
11. Robert Pinsky – At the Foundling Hospital (Feb)
12. William Shakespeare – As You Like It
13. Marie Howe – The Good Thief
14. Jacob Shores-Arguello – Paraiso
15. Madeline Ffitch – Valparaiso, Round the Horn
16. Susan Goldsmith Wooldridge – Poemcrazy
17. Todd Boss – Tough Luck: Poems
18. Walt Whitman – Song of Myself (Mar)
19. Marc Harshman – Believe What You Can
20. Rita Quillen – The Mad Farmer’s Wife
21. Linda Parsons Marion – This Shaky Earth
22. Greg Wrenn – Centaur
23. John Brandon – Further Joy
24. John Lane – Anthropocene Blues
25. Larry Thacker – Drifting in Awe
26. Rachel Danielle Peterson – A Girl’s A Gun
27. Michael Knight – The Holiday Season
28. Jia Oak Baker – Well Enough to Travel
29. James M. Gifford – Jesse Stuart, Immortal Kentuckian
30. Manuel Gonzales – The Miniature Wife
31. Sharon Kay Penman – Falls the Shadow
32. Crystal Wilkinson – The Birds of Opulence
33. James Herriot – All Things Wise and Wonderful
34. Ottessa Moshfegh – My Year of Rest and Relaxation
35. Rowling, Tiffany & Thorne – Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
36. William Glasser – Choice Theory
37. James Herriot – All Creatures Great and Small
38. Sylvia Lynch – Jack Lord: An Acting Life
39. Kevin Fitton – Dropping Ballast (manuscript)
40. Jane Smiley – A Thousand Acres
41. Stephen Mitchell – Gilgamesh
42. C.D. Wright – One with Others
43. Kevin Canty – Into the Great Wide Open
44. George Eliot – Silas Marner
45. Michael Kardos – The Three-Day Affair
46. Christopher Smith – Salamanders of the Silk Road
47. Grant Faulkner, Lynn Mundell, Beret Olsen – Nothing Short of 100
48. Maureen Seaton – Fisher
49. Amy D. Clark – Success in Hill Country
50. Langston Hughes – Let America Be America Again and other poems
51. Cassie Pruyn – Lena
52. Kathryn Stripling Byer – Catching Light