New Short Story: Fiddlers

Thanks to Sliver of Stone Magazine for publishing my short story, Fiddlers, in their 16th issue. Fiddlers is sort of a dark Christmas story, so it might feel a little strange to read in this July heat wave. Or else, it might remind you what snow and cold feel like.

Sliver of Stone

The entire story can be read online at https://sliverofstonemagazine.com/fiddlers-by-denton-loving/.

One of my favorite writers, John Lane, also has an experimental essay in this issue: https://sliverofstonemagazine.com/the-father-box-by-john-lane/. It’s called The Father Box, and you should give it a read. It’s an honor to have my work anywhere in the vicinity of his!

There’s also some info about Darren Demaree’s new poetry book, Two Towns Overhttps://sliverofstonemagazine.com/2018/03/31/new-publications/.

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Submission Calls for Writers 4/4/2018

submissions

Here are a dozen journals and presses currently accepting submissions. Several of these fine presses and journals have just opened submissions at the beginning of April. A few of these have very small windows when you can submit your work, so don’t miss it! Good luck sending your work out.

Spork Press & Sporklet

Spork Press is accepting submissions for its online magazine, Sporklet, as well as for its 2019 catalog. Full length poetry manuscripts must be at least 48 pages and submitted as a PDF. For works of fiction over 100 pages, please send a synopsis and an excerpt that is 20-40 pages in length. It will likely take us up to two months to respond. Submissions to Sporklet: Poetry submissions should be 6-12 pages long. We like to feature several poems by each author. We are also very fond of long poems. Fiction submissions can include up to three short stories. There is no length limit for hybrid work. There are no reading fees. Simultaneous submissions welcome.

http://sporkpress.com/?page_id=3492

 

Moon City Review

Moon City Review is currently reading for the 2019 issue. We are accepting submissions of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, graphic narrative, translations, and book reviews.

http://www.mooncityreview.com/

 

Concho River Review

CRR is published biannually. We welcome submissions of high-quality fiction, non-fiction and poetry year-round. CRR welcomes fiction on all subjects, although we tend to publish traditional stories with a strong sense of conflict, finely drawn characters, and crisp dialogue. Length of manuscripts should be 1,500–5,000 words. CRR welcomes submissions of creatively told personal narratives and innovative approaches to the essay form. We also consider thoughtful, researched articles; especially those that explore areas that are part of our southwestern landscape and heritage. We review manuscripts of all lengths, up to 6,000 words. CRR welcomes original poetry submissions from all poets, established or emerging. Length and form are open, but shorter poems (one page or less) are preferred. Please send three to five poems at a time.

http://conchoriverreview.org/submissions.html

 

Sugared Water

Sugared Water is reading submissions during the month of April. SW is an independent lit mag published & handbound in Cincinnati, Ohio. Our cover art is original and produced in limited edition. We read poetry & prose, with a particular interest in flash and micro forms, lyric and personal essays, prose poetry, free verse poetry, and individual, strong senses of voice and place. We will consider 3-5 poems or up to 4,500 words in fiction or creative nonfiction.

https://sugaredwatermagazine.wordpress.com/submission-guidelines/

 

Ascent

Ascent publishes stories, poems, photographs and essays. Ascent opens for submissions on the first of April and will read submissions through the end of May.

http://www.readthebestwriting.com/

 

LIT Magazine

LIT: The journal of The New School Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program promotes innovative art and writing via print and digital publishing. Poetry submissions should be no more than 5 poems or 10 pages. We accept fiction and nonfiction. Prose submissions should be no longer than 25 pages, double-spaced, single-sided. Our current reading period ends in May 2018.

http://www.litmagazine.org/

 

Voices

Kentucky River Community Care is pleased to announce the second issue of Voices, a literary journal recognizing and presenting creative talent from the Kentucky River region and beyond. Our journal exists to give a voice to those who often go unheard, particularly those in the mental health community. KRCC staff and clients, as well as writers from throughout the region, are invited to submit their best prose, poetry, photography, and artwork by May 15, 2018.

http://krcccares.com/voices/

 

Memoir Mixtapes Volume 5

Memoir Mixtapes is a mashup of the two things we all love to talk about: ourselves and music. Volume 5 is our first un-themed issue. We are not currently accepting fiction pieces—after all, we are “Memoir” Mixtapes. We’re looking for your personal, creative non-fiction prose and poetry inspired by the music that makes you feel feelings. Submit one submission / one song per writer. The sweet spot for prose submissions is between 2–7 pages, single spaced. (If your submission runs a little shorter or longer, it’s not the end of the world.) Poetry submissions can be any length, but please bear in mind that over 5 pages is going to be a tougher sell. DEADLINE FOR VOL.5 SUBMISSIONS: MAY 16, 2018.

https://memoirmixtapes.com/submissions/

 

Terrain

Our online journal accepts only the finest poetry, essays, fiction, articles, artwork, videos, and other contributions—material that reaches deep into the earth’s fiery core, or humanity’s incalculable core, and brings forth new insights and wisdom. We are currently accepting regular submissions of poetry, nonfiction, fiction, reviews, and videos. There is no fee (nor payment) for regular contributions. Our reading period ends May 30, 2018. Submit from two to six poems of any length in a single document. Creative nonfiction, photo, personal, and other essays need not follow any particular essay style. 6,000 words maximum for creative nonfiction. Articles may be technical or journalistic in nature. Short stories, excerpts from novels, flash fiction, radio plays, drama, and other forms of fiction are encouraged. 6,000 words maximum.

https://www.terrain.org/submit/regular-submission-guidelines/

 

Tammy, a print journal of prose and poetry

Tammy is a print publication that features writing from the esteemed fringes and unguarded egresses of American letters, international writing in translation, and forms of visual art that lend themselves to the printed page.  Now reading for its sixth issue. Recent contributors include Amanda Goldblatt, Lydia Davis and Matt Bell. Tammy’s current reading period runs through June 1, 2018.

https://tammy.submittable.com/submit

 

Howling Bird Press

Howling Bird Press is open for submissions of book-length fiction manuscripts from April 1 to July 31, 2018. The press welcomes innovative, original work from established and emerging authors. The competition is open to all writers in English living in the U.S., whether published or unpublished. Manuscripts may be short stories, novels, novellas, etc. Word counts should be in the 40,000 to 60,000 range. File formats should be either Word .doc or .docx or PDF. Pages should be numbered, and the author’s name and address should appear on the first page. Include a cover letter in the form provided online, and list contact information and a short (100 to 200 word) bio. There is a $25 entry fee. The winner is announced in January 2019. The winner receives $1,000 and book publication in fall 2019.

Howling Bird Press books are distributed by Small Press Distribution and are available at online retailers and in bookstores nationwide.

http://www.augsburg.edu/mfa/howling-bird-press/

https://augsburghowlingbirdpress.submittable.com/submit

 

Consequence

Consequence is reading submissions until September 30, 2018. We publish short fiction, poetry, non-fiction, interviews, visual art, and reviews primarily focused on the culture of war. For fiction and non-fiction: please submit one piece of no more than 5,000 words. For poetry: please submit up to five poems of any length. Translations are acceptable if the author’s permission has been granted. Simultaneous submissions are welcome and encouraged, but if your work is accepted elsewhere, please let us know immediately. Each submission may be accepted for publication in the print edition of CONSEQUENCE and CONSEQUENCE Online.

http://www.consequencemagazine.org/submit/

Eric Shonkwiler’s Moon Up, Past Full

Frank Bill may have said it best when he said that Eric Shonkwiler “has an eye for detail and a lot of heart. His words stay with you.”

I picked up Shonkwiler’s collection of novellas and stories, Moon Up, Past Full, when I was in Washington DC in 2017 for AWP.  For the rest of the year, the book sat at the top of my to-read pile, but I was having a hard time reading anything. When I finally picked the book up this week, it was like taking a shot of good whiskey—smoother than you could hope for and over quicker than you want it to be.

MUPFfc

I admire this book and Shonkwiler’s writing so much.  His stories are perfectly balanced between character and action. His imagery is great. His language has some beautifully poetic turns but is also perfectly precise. So much happens in each story that even the shorter pieces feel completely developed and novelistic in scope. However, it is in the longer works in this collection where Shonkwiler really shines.

The longest piece in the collection, “GO21,”—an apocalypse-type story that I didn’t want to end—was also one of my favorites. The story works on so many levels.  It’s a must read.

Another favorite was the story, “Rene,” originally serialized in three parts online at Fiddleblack. Rene is a young woman on a horse with a sick mother.  Like all of Shonkwiler’s stories, the complications keep adding up as the story goes along. Unlike most of the other pieces, Shonkwiler is exploring issues of race and class in this story. I highly recommend you click the link and read the story for yourself.

It’s not by any means one of the longest stories in the collection, but “My Wakeup” is probably my absolute favorite of these stories.  The story was originally published online at Splinter Generation, and again, I recommend you read it now. Like Shonkwiler’s other work, this story is detailed and deceptively simple.  It starts off with Geier, an Iraq war vet, on his return home from the base in Kuwait. Once back and unsure of what to do with himself, he hooks up with another former soldier, Jones, and the two take a road trip cross country.  Some of the drinking and drugging and whoring might be predicable, but (like all of Shonkwiler’s stories) the feeling behind it all feels tragically sincere which makes it unique. And beautiful. And well worth the read.

For more about Eric Shonkwiler and his writing, check out his webpage: http://www.ericshonkwiler.com/.  Follow him on Twitter: @eshonkwiler

Mark Powell’s Small Treasons

Mark Powell’s latest novel, Small Treasons, examines a number of the tragedies and obstacles that particularly face us in these uncertain times.  But also, as with the best of literature, Powell is exploring some of the most universal questions of humanity.  Perhaps the central question of this book is about forgiveness.  Forgiveness of others, and more importantly, forgiveness of ourselves.

At the heart of this question is John Maynard, man whose past blocks him from having genuine relationships with his parents, his children and even his wife.  His wife, Tess, has a secret also.  She has become obsessed with videos ISIS beheadings.  And then there is Reed Sharma, one of Powell’s most complex characters: a young, would-be jihadist searching for something truthful, something more meaningful than those things that satisfy most young Americans, but unable to discern love from hate.

One of the strongest factors that keeps forgiveness at bay is the distance that builds between us and others.  Powell wrote an essay for Authors ‘Round The South about Don DeLillo’s book Players and how that book and the idea of distance inspired Small Treasons: http://authorsroundthesouth.com/90-the-southern-bookstore/10693-mark-powell-finds-his-bookstore.

I’ve read all of Mark Powell’s novels, falling in love along the way with all of them.  There are lines and images from each one that stick with me, and even more so, there are life-shattering questions and explorations from each book that haunt me.  Possibly to Powell’s own detriment, he is able to see the ever-moving mechanics of our modern world, all of the forces working with and against each other.  To our great fortune, Powell is able to use that knowledge to write a book like Small Treasons, both beautiful and tragic.

MarkPowell_AndBook_m

For more about Mark Powell and his work, check out his webpage http://www.markpowellauthor.com/.